Sales Training Guidelines

If you want to increase the effectiveness of your sales training use these simple but powerful guidelines.

Managers who view training sessions as merely a series of skill and product training exercises will fall short of providing a sales training guidelineswell-rounded training experience.  Salespeople also need feedback on how they’re doing, measures of adequate and maximum performance, and persuading that they’ll benefit from it all in the long run.  In fact, every training session should be structured so as to answer the following six questions for Salespeople:

  • What am I supposed to do?
  • How is the job supposed to be done for maximum effectiveness?
  • What is acceptable performance?
  • How well am I doing?
  • How can I do better?
  • What’s in it for me if I do?

We, therefore, recommend that you follow the Seven-Step Sales Training Model outlined below.

                                    SEVEN-STEP SALES TRAINING MODEL

1.   Explain. Tell Salespeople what will be covered, how it is to be done and why.

2.   Ask. Have them describe their understanding of what will be covered.  Remember, if they   can’t tell you, they don’t know.

3.   Demonstrate. Provide a “model” showing proper technique.

4.   Observe. Allow them to try out the same behavior (either in a simulated or real situation.

5.   Feedback. Give them meaningful feedback to reinforce the positive and identify areas they need further improvement.

6.   Plan. Engage them in a planning process that outlines the specifics of how and when they will practice and apply the new behaviors.

7.   Follow-up. Always review the results of their development activities.  Use the Results to adjust future training activities.

These guidelines are simple, practical and proven. Make sure that you incorporate them into your sales training efforts. You’ll be pleasantly surprised at how your salespeople respond and more importantly how they perform.

Sales Coaching : When Do You Step In on a Sales Call?

A common problem on coaching calls is the sales manager taking over the sales call or “stepping in”. Sales managers often ask “when is it appropriate to step in?” Some of the most common reasons given for stepping in are:

• The salesperson is really in trouble

• The salesperson has made a major mistake

• The salesperson is about to lose a sale

• It’s a very big sale

• The salesperson can’t handle the customer

Although all of these are very compelling reasons for stepping in, they are merely a symptom of a much bigger problem. If you have to step in on a coaching call, it’s a signal that you have failed as a coach on that call. Stepping in prevents the salesperson from developing his/her selling skills and it prevents you from being able to fully exercise your coaching skills. Once you step in, you are no longer an objective observer, but an active participant. This severally limits your ability to focus on what the salesperson is doing right or wrong. When you step in, you are telling the salesperson that this call is more important than his or her development.

If salespeople aren’t ready to make a call on their own, then make the call a joint call or a training call. But, if you agree that it’s a coaching call and salespeople are responsible for the outcome, then let them succeed or fail on their own merits. Your job at that point is to make sure your salespeople have learned from the experience.

Sales Management Strategies: Making Sales Calls with Your Reps

In today’s demanding marketplace sales managers must have strategies for increasing sales and developing people. Besides enhancing relationships with customers making calls is the best opportunity to do both. This article outlines strategies for making three different sales calls that will drive sales and develop your people. They are:

• Training
• Joint
• Coaching

Each has a different purpose, strategy and the roles for both you and the salesperson are also different.

Training calls teach the salesperson how to do a specific aspect of the job. Your make the presentation while the salesperson observes. The key to a success is for you to demonstrate proper selling skills and techniques. Your job is to give the salesperson an effective model and make sure the salesperson understands how to perform the aspect of the job you have demonstrated. Before the call, make sure the salesperson knows:

  • The objectives (both performance and development)
  • The skills or techniques you are demonstrating
  • His/her role

After, be sure to review the following:

  • Were the objectives achieved?
  • What helped?
  • What hindered?
  • How else could the call have been made?

Joint calls support a team approach. Both you and the salesperson have defined roles and responsibilities. Before, make sure you review the following:

  • The objectives (both performance and development)
  • The strategy
  • What role will each person play?
  • Who is responsible for each segment of the call?
  • How will you interact during the call?

After, you should discuss:

  • Were the objectives met?
  • What helped?
  • What hindered?
  • How could the call have been improved?
  • Who is responsible for following up on commitments made during the call (if any)?

Coaching calls are designed for you to observe and assess the salesperson’s performance. The salesperson’s role is to make the sales call. Your role is to observe and offer feedback after the call. Coaching calls are a true test of your listening and observing skills, not your selling skills. Before, be sure to cover:

  • The objectives (both performance and development)
  • The strategy
  • Responses to obstacles that may come up

After, discuss the following:

  • Were the objectives met?
  • What helped (what were the salesperson’s strengths)?
  • What hindered (what were the salesperson’s improvement opportunities)?
  • How could the call have been improved or handled differently?
  • What actions need to be taken next

Seating relative to the customer is important on each situation. The key is for you to situate yourself consistent with the agreed upon role and objectives. Use these guidelines:

Training calls-Position yourself closest to the customer so that the salesperson can observe easily. Also the proximity to the customer establishes that you are taking the lead.

Joint Calls-Sit side by side with the salesperson. This signals equality of your roles and makes it easy for “handing off” to each other.

Coaching calls– The salesperson should be closest to the customer making sure that you are out of the salesperson’s peripheral view. This positioning establishes the salesperson as the lead and helps prevent the salesperson from presenting to you instead of the customer.

To increase sales you need a well-trained and high performing sale force.Making sales calls with your salespeople gives you the greatest leverage points for developing them and making sales. To make sure you have successful call strategies set clear expectations and define roles.