Time Management: 3 Quick and Easy Steps to Manage Your Time Better

Time ManagementTime management is one of the least-mastered and most-desired skills in out fast-paced modern world.  Time management truly is critical to becoming successful, doing everything you want to, and achieving ultimate success.

Here are 3 quick and easy steps to help you manage your time better:

1)         Eliminate time wasters in your life.  Time wasters are things that interrupt you and you spend time doing, but you wouldn’t have chosen to do them given the choice.  Eliminating these time wasters is critical for time management:

•           Email—If you are spending more than 30 minutes per day on email (unless that is your business) you are spending too much!

•           Telephone—If you answer the phone live more than 5 times per day during your productive time (work, work at home, etc.) you are sacrificing time management and efficiency.  When you answer the phone, you interrupt your current productive flow and this kills your productivity.

•           Television—This must be limited for you to achieve ultimate control over your time.  My recommendation is 30 minutes per day, especially if you are not getting all the things done you need or want to.

2)         Make a list of what is genuinely important in your life and just start doing the    things on your list.  One of the keys to time management is prioritization—you absolutely must know what you want to accomplish and then go do it.  Today’s world has too many distractions and when you allow those distractions to become priority, you sacrifice time management.  Follow these steps:

•           Make of list of what you want to accomplish

•           Set time frames for accomplishing each item

•           Organize each item in order of importance

•           Create a game plan for achieving each of your goals in its respective time frame

3)         Begin to focus on time management throughout the course of the day.  Your consistent focus must be on managing your time.  Once you have determined your goals and your priorities, start focusing on simply getting those things done.  If something isn’t on your goals list for this week—don’t do it until all your goals are done.  When you prioritize every interruption that occurs and put your goals last, you will not accomplish your goals.  Instead, you will be a slave (as you probably are now) to interruptions and probably feel like you never accomplish enough.

Why Sales Training Fails

Many sales executive wonder why sales training fails to get results. Unfortunately, many sales managers and trainers spend time  and effort doing sales training that never deliver bottom line results. We’ll explore  the twelve most common reasons why sales training fails and what to do to avoid  them. The twelve reasonswhy sales training fails are:

1. No support. Training is not linked to top management’s mission, goals and  priorities.

2. No need. Salespeople do not see a reason to change or don’t feel a need  for the training.

3. No Relevance. Salespeople feel the concepts or materials don’t apply to  their situation or territory.

4. Distractions. Salespeople are so preoccupied with events outside of the  training (i.e. making budget, handling a customer complaint, etc.) that they  can’t focus on the training itself.

5. Poor planning. The training isn’t organized and time and resources are  poorly used..

6. No Involvement. Training relies on lecture and other passive learning  methodologies.

7. No confidence. Salespeople don’t develop enough confidence during the  training to try the new approach on the job.

8. No role model. Managers fail to provide a positive role model for the  skills and concepts presented. The message is, “do as I say, not as I do.

9. No reward. Salespeople don’t receive any positive reinforcement or payoff  for trying new approaches.

10.No coaching. Salespeople don’t receive coaching on how to handle specific  on-the-job situations.

11.No feedback. Salespeople don’t receive feedback about how their efforts  impact the result.

12.Task Interference. Salespeople encounter barriers, including lack of time,  physical environment, resources, policies and lack of authority as they attempt  to use new skills.

Keep these twelve reasons in mind as you prepare for a training event. You  can avoid most, if not all with proper planning, preparation, and follow  through. For more information on onboarding new salespeople go to:trainingwinnersnow

10 Strategies for Increasing Personal Productivity

The Problem

In a competitive marketplace, it’s imperative that you stay ahead of the competition.  Doing so means optimizing your personal productivity.  This means staying focused on the activities that produce the results you want.

The Solution

Here are 10 strategies for increasing your personal productivity.

  1. Review your goals regularly to make sure your work is personally satisfying.
  2. Focus on results, not activity.  It’s not how hard you work, but what you accomplish that counts.
  3. Remember the 80/20 rule: 20 percent of your activities produce 80 percent of your results, while the remaining 80 percent of your activities produces only 20 percent of your results. Make sure you know which activities are which.
  4. Know when your job’s “prime time” is. Those are periods of the day or week that are most productive and provide the best results.  Scheduling your activities during such “prime times” will bring maximum results in the shortest time.
  5. Most people also have their own personal prime times. Those are periods of time they find themselves personally most productive. Whenever possible, try to align your schedule to take advantage of your prime personal times, by tackling those activities that are most difficult when you are to be at your best.
  6. Track your results and review your progress. Know how you’re spending your time. This will help you find ways to make your job more interesting, break-up the routine and take advantage of new challenges.
  7. Stay focused by filtering out the irrelevant. Do this by defining the precise objective of the activity at hand. Periodically ask yourself, “What’s the best use of my time right now?” Using this question as a tool will help you stay on track.
  8. After prioritizing your activities, get started. The hardest part of writing a letter is the first line. The toughest part of cold calling is picking up the receiver. So tackle your “A” priorities now.
  9. Do it right the first time. Many people don’t have time to adhere to this principle. However, they always seem to find time to do the task over.
  10. Mentally plan the day before it begins by visualizing what you need to accomplish for the entire day. Research from a wide variety of organizations determined that this practice is one of the most distinguishable characteristics among high performance people. The techniques used may vary from formulating a “to do list” just before going to bed, to planning the day while showering. But, high performers develop the specific discipline of mentally starting the day before the activities actually begin.