Goal Setting Success: Developing a Personal Business and Life Plan

Goal setting success is a key strategy for mastering your time, money and your life. If you’re not as success as you want simply look at your goals and plans to achieve them. Many people lose site of the ultimate purpose of setting goals and mastering their time.  When they free up time in one area of their life, they spend it in areas that aren’t fulfilling.  By setting and prioritizing goals in all areas of your life, you are laying a foundation of living your life “on purpose”.  This will allow you to spend more of your time doing things that are important and fulfilling.

Personal Business Plan

To help you start practically applying goal setting now, you should develop a Personal Business Plan. Completing the Personal Business Plan will help you set specific and realistic financial goals for yourself.  This is an important step in the time mastery process because people’s financial health often dictates the status of other areas of their lives.   In business you must manage the finances to both survive and to thrive.  Money is a tool that provides people a vehicle for living the life they want.  Most people complain about not having enough time, money, and freedom.  If you increase the money you have, you then have the option of having more time and freedom for the things you enjoy.  By managing your time and your life you give yourself the option of freedom.  If you don’t have the financial wherewithal, you don’t give yourself that option and thus your freedom is limited.

In addition to using the Personal Business Plan to set financial goals for yourself, you will want to develop a Personal Life Plan to set goals in other areas, including:

  • Family
  • Relationships
  • Career
  • Physical
  • Spiritual
  • Personal development

Personal Life Plan

The key to a successful Personal Life Plan is paying attention to what’s really important.  We pay attention to something by spending time doing it.  If being physically fit is important, a person will spend time exercising.  If one’s family is important, time is spent with the family.  Since there will always be competition for time, it is important to be clear about your priorities.  Knowing what’s really important makes it easier for people to know what to say “yes” and “no” to.

A good example of knowing what’s important is illustrated by a story told by Shelly Lazarus, President of Ogilvy Mather-North America (one of the world’s largest advertising agencies).  Shelly was scheduled to go to a team meeting for a major client on the same day as her son’s field day at school.  Shelly chose to watch her son participate in field day rather than make the meeting.  When her boss asked why she missed the meeting she replied, “We had a team of eight people at that meeting and in two weeks nobody will remember who was there and who wasn’t.  If I had missed my son’s field day, he never would have forgotten.”

When faced with conflicting priorities, do what is most important. Completing the Personal Life Plan will help you focus on what’s really important in your life.

Goal setting without plans is wishful thinking. By connecting your Personal Business Plan with your Personal Life Plan you are putting in place the foundation that will keep you focused and your business and personal life aligned. Doing so increases your chances of achieving goal setting success.

10 Strategies for Increasing Personal Productivity

The Problem

In a competitive marketplace, it’s imperative that you stay ahead of the competition.  Doing so means optimizing your personal productivity.  This means staying focused on the activities that produce the results you want.

The Solution

Here are 10 strategies for increasing your personal productivity.

  1. Review your goals regularly to make sure your work is personally satisfying.
  2. Focus on results, not activity.  It’s not how hard you work, but what you accomplish that counts.
  3. Remember the 80/20 rule: 20 percent of your activities produce 80 percent of your results, while the remaining 80 percent of your activities produces only 20 percent of your results. Make sure you know which activities are which.
  4. Know when your job’s “prime time” is. Those are periods of the day or week that are most productive and provide the best results.  Scheduling your activities during such “prime times” will bring maximum results in the shortest time.
  5. Most people also have their own personal prime times. Those are periods of time they find themselves personally most productive. Whenever possible, try to align your schedule to take advantage of your prime personal times, by tackling those activities that are most difficult when you are to be at your best.
  6. Track your results and review your progress. Know how you’re spending your time. This will help you find ways to make your job more interesting, break-up the routine and take advantage of new challenges.
  7. Stay focused by filtering out the irrelevant. Do this by defining the precise objective of the activity at hand. Periodically ask yourself, “What’s the best use of my time right now?” Using this question as a tool will help you stay on track.
  8. After prioritizing your activities, get started. The hardest part of writing a letter is the first line. The toughest part of cold calling is picking up the receiver. So tackle your “A” priorities now.
  9. Do it right the first time. Many people don’t have time to adhere to this principle. However, they always seem to find time to do the task over.
  10. Mentally plan the day before it begins by visualizing what you need to accomplish for the entire day. Research from a wide variety of organizations determined that this practice is one of the most distinguishable characteristics among high performance people. The techniques used may vary from formulating a “to do list” just before going to bed, to planning the day while showering. But, high performers develop the specific discipline of mentally starting the day before the activities actually begin.