Are You Committed to Leading Change?

leading changeA critical measure of success in leading change is your commitment.  Once you’ve weighed the options, given others a chance for input and settled on the best course of action.  You must be resolute, even passionate about your determination to follow through.  If you can’t be excited about where the organization is going, how can you expect your people to be.

Don’t try to reduce resistance by softening your position.  This is taken as a sign of weakness and becomes a rallying point for resisters. Keep in mind that in times of uncertainty, actions speak louder than words.  If pushed to the limit, you make have to make an example of someone who resists.  When this happens, make it a high profile person and make it public.  Your objective is to send a message to the others to get on board.

Change often has casualties.  This may seem heartless but it’s true. Resisters resist because they choose to do so.  They are the ones who put you in a position to choose them or the change effort.  If your change effort is worthy, the choice is an easy one.

In times of change, people gravitate to the people who have the most conviction about the future. Don’t initiate change you yourself aren’t committed to.  People will look to you for answers and to show them how to act.  If you’re certain, confident and act with congruence, they will follow.  If you lack those qualities, they will seek those that do.

Remember, you can’t manage change, you can only lead it.  When you lead change, people will follow.  So, if you’re in charge of change, lead it.  The resisters will either join the parade or voluntarily drop out.

10 Strategies for Increasing Personal Productivity

The Problem

In a competitive marketplace, it’s imperative that you stay ahead of the competition.  Doing so means optimizing your personal productivity.  This means staying focused on the activities that produce the results you want.

The Solution

Here are 10 strategies for increasing your personal productivity.

  1. Review your goals regularly to make sure your work is personally satisfying.
  2. Focus on results, not activity.  It’s not how hard you work, but what you accomplish that counts.
  3. Remember the 80/20 rule: 20 percent of your activities produce 80 percent of your results, while the remaining 80 percent of your activities produces only 20 percent of your results. Make sure you know which activities are which.
  4. Know when your job’s “prime time” is. Those are periods of the day or week that are most productive and provide the best results.  Scheduling your activities during such “prime times” will bring maximum results in the shortest time.
  5. Most people also have their own personal prime times. Those are periods of time they find themselves personally most productive. Whenever possible, try to align your schedule to take advantage of your prime personal times, by tackling those activities that are most difficult when you are to be at your best.
  6. Track your results and review your progress. Know how you’re spending your time. This will help you find ways to make your job more interesting, break-up the routine and take advantage of new challenges.
  7. Stay focused by filtering out the irrelevant. Do this by defining the precise objective of the activity at hand. Periodically ask yourself, “What’s the best use of my time right now?” Using this question as a tool will help you stay on track.
  8. After prioritizing your activities, get started. The hardest part of writing a letter is the first line. The toughest part of cold calling is picking up the receiver. So tackle your “A” priorities now.
  9. Do it right the first time. Many people don’t have time to adhere to this principle. However, they always seem to find time to do the task over.
  10. Mentally plan the day before it begins by visualizing what you need to accomplish for the entire day. Research from a wide variety of organizations determined that this practice is one of the most distinguishable characteristics among high performance people. The techniques used may vary from formulating a “to do list” just before going to bed, to planning the day while showering. But, high performers develop the specific discipline of mentally starting the day before the activities actually begin.