Rating Systems: Do they Improve Performance?

Rating systems have been relied upon for years to improve performance. Often times a person’s career, pay raise or job is in the balance.

How effective is your performance management rating system?

A  study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology sheds a not too flattering light on rating systems and what they really measure.

“The most comprehensive research on what ratings actually measure was conducted by professors Mount, Scullen, and Goff. In their study, 4,492 individuals were rated on a number of different performance dimensions by two bosses, two peers and two subordinates, who combined to produce almost half a million ratings. The researchers then analyzed these ratings and discovered that 54% of the variance in the ratings could be accounted for by “idiosyncratic rater effects”—namely the peculiarities of each individual rater’s perception. Only 21% of the variance in ratings could be explained by the ratee’s actual performance. All of which led the researchers to the following conclusion:

“Although it is implicitly assumed that the ratings measure the performance of the ratee, most of what is being measured by the ratings is the unique rating tendencies of the rater. Thus ratings reveal more about the rater than they do about the ratee.”

Scullen, S., Mount, M., & Goff, M. (2000). Understanding the latent structure of job performance ratings. J Appl Psychol., 85(6), 956–70.

What’s your experience been with rating systems in your organization? Do you feel they are worth the time and effort?

Developing Salespeople: Creating a Coaching Budget

Developing salespeople is like saving for retirement. If you don’t create  a realistic plan and invest accordingly you’ll be disappointed when you retire. Salespeople need a plan and an investment of time and energy in order to help them realize their full potential. Too often training and developing salespeople becomes a “round to it” for sales managers because they have other more pressideveloping salespeopleng things to do…like paper work and meetings. This is a mistake you can’t afford to make.

Another mistake sales managers make is treating every salesperson the same. This article will help develop salespeople while getting the most from each salesperson and your time.

Developing Salespeople

Each salesperson will require different approaches and need varying amounts of time.  Since you can’t be all things to all people, you must assess where your management time will bring its greatest return.  This means you must allocate your coaching time to make sure the people who have the greatest need and potential receives the most time.  The people who have the least need and represent the smallest potential for improvement receive the least time.

To make sure that you effectively allocate your time properly you’ll need to take the following actions:

      Create a Coaching Budget — To help you determine how much time you have available to spend with your people. For example if there are 240 work days and you want to spend 60% of your time coaching salespeople then your budget is 144 days. The results you get from developing salespeople are determined by how you spend your coaching budget.

      Assess each salesperson — When assessing salespeople you want to focus on their skills, knowledge and attitude. Make sure that you assess for  both the needs and potential of your people.  This will help you to spend the most time where the need and potential is greatest.

      Allocation of Coaching Days — Based on your assessment you now must commit your time to ensures that each salesperson gets an optimal amount of coaching time.  The key to setting priorities in this situation is to ask these questions “What will happen to performance if I don’t spend time with the salespeople?” and, “What will happen if I do?”

      Coaching Calendar — This formalizes your allocation of coaching time.  Since coaching time is the most important activity you can perform schedule it in your weekly and monthly plans first.  Then schedule other activities around your allocated coaching days.  Doing so will help prevent you from getting bogged down doing unimportant but urgent tasks instead of spending time with your people.

Developing salespeople won’t happen unless you make the time to do it. There are always going to be activities waiting to steal your time and distract you from your most important responsibility. If you want your salespeople to be peak performers then create your coaching budget and stick with it. Committing your budget to your calendar helps create the necessary discipline to make it happen.

If you’d like more information on creating a coaching budget and developing salespeople check out my eBook “Coaching for Peak Performance”. 

Developing Salespeople with Effective Coaching

Developing salespeople doesn’t happen automatically. Many sales manager never invest the time and attention to do so and end up paying the price in turnover and poor sales. Developing salespeople requires you to understand and apply a simple yet powerful coaching process.  This process involves three steps. They are:developing salespeople

1.    Recognize coachable moments. Coachable mo­ments are specific opportunities where coaching is most likely to make an impact. Coachable mo­ments fall into three ar­eas:

  • When sales­people perform well;
  • When sales­people fail to per­form; and
  • When salespeople seek help.

2.    Engage. This means taking the coach­-able mo­ments and turning them into performance discus­sions. These performance discus­sions should be brief, very fo­cused, and viewed as helpful by salespeople. These are great  opportunities for developing salespeople.

3.    Mobilize. To effect change, man­agers must con­vert the perfor­mance discussions into actions. These actions can be comprehen­sive (e.g., devel­op­ing a key ac­count plan) or focused (e.g., use visuals during a presentation). Developing salespeople requires that you monitor your salespeople’s progress with the actions you assign.

Coachable Moments

In order to get peak performance from your salespeople you have to use every opportunity to develop their effectiveness. You as a coach must recognize and respond to coaching opportunities as they present themselves. This means using a different approach with each coachable moment. We’ll discuss each one separately.

When salespeople perform well.  Your objective in this situation is to reinforce the salesperson’s positive behavior. This coachable moment is often overlooked because many managers feel that salespeo­ple don’t need positive reinforcement. Unfortunately, this is a faulty assumption. Reinforcing positive behavior increases the frequency of the behavior. If you fail to reinforce positive behavior, it will occur less often.

When you want to reinforce or praise the perfor­mance of a salesperson, use the BIT Model.

B= Behavior Describe what the salesperson is doing that is positive.

I= Impact Describe why the salesperson’s perfor­mance is important and how it contributes to the organiza­tion.

T= Thank You Deliver a specific expression of appreciation.

An example of giving a BIT would be: “Making those extra calls this month has really paid off. Your 20 percent over budget really helped us get over the top this month. I really appreciate the extra effort you’ve put in. Keep up the great work!

When salespeople fail to perform. Your objective for this coachable moment is to give feedback and help salespeople improve a specific area of their performance. Giving negative feedback is not always easy, but it is necessary for improvement. To mini­mize the potential of causing salespeople to become defensive and not motivated, make sure your feedback is specific, focuses on behavior, and helpful. Using the BIEC Model should help you do so effectively.

B=  Behavior-Describe what his/her behavior is doing or not doing that needs improvement.

I= Impact-Describe how the behavior is impact­ing performance.

E=  Expectation-Explain what you expect the salesperson to do or not do to change.

C=Consequence-Explain what will happen if the salesperson changes or the consequences if the behav­ior continues.

He­re’s an exam­ple of the BIEC Model:  “Mary, this is the fourth time this month you’ve submitted sales orders with incomplete or inaccurate informa­tion. When you do this, the order has to be re-written and reprocessed. This adds to our costs and delays the order from being pro­cessed. Delays in orders can lead to lost sales and dissatisfied custom­ers. From now on, I expect your orders to be submit­ted with all the information complete and accurate. Doing so will make it easier to process your orders and keep your customers happy. Also, we can’t afford to jeopardize business because of poor paper­work. If there are future prob­lems, we’ll have to review your account list”.

When your salespeople seek help in solving a problem or maximizing an opportunity. Too often, managers solve their people’s problem instead of managing the problem-solving process. Managers take this approach because it seems the most expedient. In the short run, it probably is. But in the long run, the approach creates salespeople who are dependent on their managers. If you want to develop salespeople who take initiative, accept responsibility, and hold themselves accountable, then remember, the goal of this coachable moment is to support their efforts, not solve their problems.

Using the CEAC Model will help you draw your salespeople out and identify how you can best support their efforts.

C= Clarify the problem or opportunity.

E= Engage in a discussion of what options are available to address the issue.

A= Agree on actions to be taken with deadlines (What, by when and by whom).

C= Commit your support to the initiative.

Summary

Developing salespeople with effective coaching is an investment that requires both time and effort. A few minutes before and after a sales call or while a salesperson is developing a proposal can pay huge dividends.  Therefore,you must view coachable moments as opportunities to make a difference, not a distraction from your job.  Remember, sales managers who are constantly looking for oppor­tunities to make a difference, generally do. So, don’t let your coachable moments go unful­filled.

Sales Process: The Key to Growing Sales, Profits and Customer Loyalty

sales processThe sales process is one of the most overlooked assets a small business has for growing sales, profits and customer loyalty. If you want to grow your business this is one of the first places to look for dramatic results. I’ll explain why and what you can do to get the most out of yours.

A sales process is a series of documented steps salespeople follow to move prospects from first contact to purchase. It should include:

  • Each specific step a prospects take
  • Knowledge prospects need to move to the next step
  • Resources you can provide to help prospects move forward
  • Length of time a prospects need at each step
  • Metrics that measure conversion rates (the percentage of prospects that move from one step to the next) for each step

With a documented sales process, you have a powerful tool that enables you to:

  • Sell more efficiently
  • Create more accurate sales and revenue reports
  • Estimate the revenue and return on investment (ROI) of your marketing campaigns
  • See which stages take the most time and find ways to move prospects forward
  • Create better literature and tools
  • Improve your campaigns
  • Minimize time your reps spend on estimates and forecasts

Unfortunately, with all the benefits of a defined sales process 70% of companies don’t require their salespeople to comply with a standardized, documented set of sales processes.*(*ES Research Group)

Not getting  compliance may be caused by any number of factors including:  the process is poorly designed, or it’s not understood or it’s not supported by the organization. For whatever reason, allowing salespeople to “wing it” is a very expensive business strategy. Without a defined sales process resources can’t be effectively allocated, revenues can’t be accurately forecasted and customers may not get the information they need when they need it. All these factors contribute to lost sales, lower profits and diminished customer loyalty.

Even if your company has a defined sales process, that doesn’t guarantee success. Your next challenge is to make sure that your sales process aligns with your customers’ buying process. Starting the sales relationship just after a customer purchased from a competitor is far more challenging than starting when the customer first becomes aware of a need or want. When do you want your salespeople to start allocating selling time and company resources? Aligning your sales process with your customers’  buying process ensures your selling efforts begin as early in the buying process as possible. Thus giving you the best chance to influence the sales outcome.

Does your sales process make sure that you use the right selling effort supported by the right resources to make sure that sales are made in the shortest time with the fewest resources? If your answer is not a definite yes then you have a great opportunity for growing your business without adding costs. Improving your sales process doesn’t add costs because it’s simply directing your selling effort more effectively. The sooner you start the sooner you’ll start seeing bottom line results.

Sales Message: Is Yours Positioning You to Win?

Sales MessageIs your sales message positioning you win, draw or lose? The answer depends on several factors including if your sales message is  heard, who is hearing it and how effective it is.

Having your message heard is a role of the media, message, timing, frequency and delivery. A recent LinkedIn survey revealed the number-one challenge on the minds of sales professionals was “getting the attention of prospects”. Customers are bombarded with information, so much so everything begins to sound like “Blah, Blah, Blah”. Making matters more challenging is only 3% of your target market is in the buying mode at a given time. If they aren’t buying they aren’t listening.  Getting your sales message to your customers too early, too late or without impact is a waste of time, money and energy.

In the communication jungle, there are just too many products, too many companies, and too much marketing noise. The mind, as a defense against the huge volume of today’s communications, screens and rejects much of the information it’s offered. The only hope to deliver your sales message is to be selective and to focus on narrow targets. In a word: “positioning.”

According to John Foley CEO of Interlink One,“This is a one-on-one world…you have to really be more relevant with the marketing channel and the media you use to the people you’re trying to reach and not only relevant in those channels or media, but also the content, messaging, timing, and even how they’ll respond.”

To effectively position your your products and services you must find out:

  • How the marketplace sees your company
  • How your ideal or target customers see your company and what they value
  • What you know about your own company and the customer value it creates

Positioning your sales message should be a foundation for action to design, manage and defend your brand. It should inform everything you do, including:

  • What  customer value you create
  • What you value
  • What’s your sustainable competitive advantage
  • How you conduct your business
  • How you communicate and interact with customers

Business consultant and CEO of Grow My Revenue Ian Altman worked with a health insurance company who was getting a 1% response rate to their cold calling efforts. Sales were down and morale was even lower. Altman helped the company change their generic sales message to one that highlighted what the company did best and appealed to a large segment of the market. Selling the same products with the same salespeople, the company saw its response rate increase to 30%. Achieving such a dramatic increase was accomplished by simply delivering a better sales message.

You must view your sales and marketing messaging as an asset that  you can quickly leverage into increased sales and profits.

Take a close look at your sales message and ask yourself: How does it help your ideal customers  clearly understand how your solution uniquely satisfies their buying criteria and emotional needs; and is it delivered when it most influences the buying decision in your favor? If you answered no to either one you’ve got some work to do. Improve your sales message and watch sales grow.

Build Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty with Social Motives

customer satisfaction amd loyaltyCustomer satisfaction and loyalty are key ingredients for every business. If you want to create a legion of satisfied and loyal customers you’ll need to learn what I learned on one of my first sales jobs.

 As a college stu­dent, I spent one summer selling encyclope­dias door to door. After a week of training I was sent out into the field where my initial day in the field was a picture in con­trasts. My first pre­sen­tation resulted in a sale, but I was almost physically thrown out on the second. Somewhat perplexed, I sought advice from my father, who spent his career in sales and sales management.  “Dad,” I said, “I can’t figure it out. I made the same presentation to both customers and got entirely different results.” My father asked, “Was every­thing the same?” “Of course it was,” I an­swered. “I’ve been practicing my presentation for a week.” My father asked, “Was everything on both calls exactly the same?” I thought for a moment. “Ev­erything was the same,” I said, “except the custom­er.” My father smiled and then congratu­lat­ed me on discovering one of the most important keys to sales success: People are different. If you want to sell them, you must do it the way they want to buy, not how you like to sell. Mastering this skill will go a long way towards helping you build customer satisfaction and loyalty.

Most salespeople intuitively treat each custom­er differently; however, they usually relate better to some customers than others. When you experience a good relationship with a customer from the start, you are most likely selling in your comfort zone; that is, your natural style of selling “fits” the approach that the customer appreciates when buying. These customers are likely to be both satisfied and loyal because of how you sell them.

On the other hand, when it’s difficult to establish rapport or make progress with a cus­tom­er, you are probably selling outside of your comfort zone. The customer wants to buy in a way that is in conflict with your natural style.  In these situations, you have two choices: adapt your style or find another customer who likes the way you sell. Unfortunately, this approach will not help you build customer satisfaction and loyalty. Therefore , you probably only have one choice, because if you don’t adapt, you’ll have to find another customer anyway.

One way to improve your ability to adapt is to recognize and respond to your customer’s motiva­tional needs. Motivational needs are internal desires that cause people to respond in a particular way.  Although we can’t look inside of people and see their needs, we can observe their behavior.  People do things for a purpose. If we recognize their behavioral patterns and trends, we can anticipate what it takes to meet their needs. When people’s needs are met they reward you with customer satisfaction and loyalty.

 How people respond in certain situations gives clues to their motivational needs. The more frequent and consistent a behavior is the stronger the motivational need. For example, if you ask a customer what type of food she would like for lunch Chinese, Italian, or French and she always prefers Italian, you can reasonably be sure she has a strong desire (e.g., need) for Italian food. Fur­thermore, taking her to an Italian restaurant will do more to enhance customer satisfaction and loyalty than taking her to your favorite Chinese restau­rant.

A simple, practical, and reliable ap­proach for recognizing and understanding motivational needs is called Social Motives. The concept of Social Motives was developed by David McClelland[i], a professor of psychology at Harvard University. In his research, McCle­lland found that we learn these needs from our experi­ences growing up, from how others react to our behavior, and from the successes, rewards, frustra­tions, and anxieties of our current experi­ences. The Social Motives consist of three basic motives:

  • Achievement, or the need to excel
  • Affiliation, or the need to belong or relate to others
  • Power, or the need to influence and control others

 Each of these three motivational patterns exists to some varying degree in each of us, according to McClelland’s research. We are, however, primari­ly motivated by one pattern. When we interact with others, our primary pattern affects the way in which relationships develop, sometimes producing fulfillment, some­times significant stress. The inter­action between our pattern and that of others makes some situa­tions stimulating, others frustrat­ing or boring, thereby affecting our personal effectiveness, often in dramatic ways.

 When you understand the dynamics of each Social Motive, then analyze your own motiva­tion and that of your prospects and cus­tomers, you can improve your sales performance in significant ways. This understanding includes fully recognizing what Social Motives are not.

They are not a system of stereotyping or pi­geonholing people.

  • They are not a replacement for others selling skills and strategies.
  • They are not a method of manipulating people.

Social Motives should be used to help you under­stand people, not judge them. When used effective­ly, Social Motives allow you to adapt your selling style so that customers view what you say in the best light possible. This increases customer satisfaction and loyalty because your approach to selling will match how your customers like to buy.

 



 [i]. The Achieving Society: Van Nastrand, 1961

Stop Customer Churn by Managing Moments of Truth

Is customer churn draining the energy, profits and brand equity out of your company? If it is then you need to stop the customer customer churnchurn immediately. Committing your company’s resources to acquiring customers only to see them leave during the next buying cycle is a prescription for failure. Stopping churn requires you to examine you relationship with your customers throughout the customer experience.

In any relationship, whether it is a marriage, a frien­dship, or a sales relation­ship, there are phases when problems or conflicts are apt to arise. If such dilem­mas are not confronted and resolved early on, the pre­mature dissolution of a partnership may result. In the case of a customer part­nership, there are phases when the buyer’s expecta­tions of your prod­uct or service are tested. During these times you must prove to your customers that your product or ser­vice is their best alternative. Such confron­tations are called Mo­ments of Truth, and how you handle them will deter­mine the longevi­ty of the rela­tionship.

Moments of Truth are the real acid tests of long-term part­nerships. If your product or service per­f­orms as intend­ed and de­livers the benefits the cus­tomer is seek­ing, ev­ery­one is happy and the rela­tion­ship is se­cure. On the other hand, if the product or service fails to per­form or deliver the expected benefits, the custom­er is unhappy and the rela­tion­ship is in jeopar­dy. This is the starting point for customer churn.

A Moment of Truth can occur at any time, in a vari­ety of situa­tions. However, to best under­stand these mo­ments, it is helpful to focus on the six most common sales situations that constitute Moments of Truth. Because of their frequency and potential impact on the sales relationship you must master the skills demanded by each of these six Mo­ments of Truth:

  1. When you’re making the sale.
  2. When the product is delivered or the service begins.
  3. When you discover a problem.
  4. When the customer complains.
  5. When the competition puts on the pressure.
  6. When you make your regular customer retention contacts.

To ensure that you handle each Moment of Truth successfully you’ll need to develop a specific plan for each one. Having a well developed plan increases your chances of solidifying the customer relationship and in stopping the cause of customer churn.

How to Retain Customers on a Regular Basis

how to retain customers How to retain customers on a regular basis is an important step for increasing sales, profits and customer loyalty. Here are three reasons why.

  • Most (68%) customers stop doing business with a company because of indifference.
  • Existing customers are more profitable long-term than new customers.
  • It costs 5-6 times more to gain new customer than it does to keep an existing customer satisfied.

That’s why one of the cardinal sins of selling in the New Economy is taking your customers for granted. Failing to communicate or stay in regular contact leaves the door open for prob­lems to arise and temptations (the competition)to enter the picture. If the lines of communication aren’t open, the cus­tom­er may not remember you or won’t think to notify you if a problem occurs or a reorder is desired.

As a salesperson and as a company it’s important to have programs in place on how to retain customers that is effective and efficient. This will maximize selling efforts and deliver the best bottom line results.

In the New economy it’s not enough to just stay in touch. Staying in touch is important but it’s only half the battle. Once contact is made, you must use the opportunity to the maximum advantage. This means that when you make customer  retention calls they must be:

Unique. Each call should have its own unique reason for existence (follow-up on a new product, information on company inno­vations or changes and new incen­tives).  Provide the customer with new information, ask additional questions, tackle varied topics.  Your customer does not want to rehash old information or waste time.

Memorable. Make each call count by making a lasting impression on the custom­er.  Customer retention calls are a personal­ly deliv­ered commercial for your product or service.  Offer your customers “food for thought”, make them laugh or give them something to remember the call. If you don’t do something to stand out in the “sea of sameness” your message will forgotten soon after you leave the call.

Personalize. Since most sales are emotional decisions supported by logic you must use theses call to connect with your customers on an emotional level. Helping your customers emotionally identify with you. your product and your company is an essential step in building customer loyalty.

Many salespeople view customer retention calls as perfunctory at best and occasionally a waste of time. Miscalculating the importance these calls usually leads to the deterioration of a relationship and ultimately lost sales.

How to retain customers on a regular basis must become a priority if you want to protect your most important asset, your customers. Remember the saying, “If you don’t take care of your customers someone else will!” Put a customer retention plan in place today.

To learn how your customer retention plans stacks up take the Growth Positioning Survey now.

How to Retain Customers When You Discover a Problem

How to retain customers when you discover a problem with your product or service is important because it sets the tone for the customer relationship.Even the best products and services occasion­ally have prob­lems. When they do, you should look upon the situation as an opportu­nity to earn customer confidence. Why? For two good rea­sons:how to retain customers

  • Some customers never know how good a product or service is until they experience a problem.
  • Solving that problem can strengthen the relationship by physically and emotionally demonstrating your concern, integrity and commitment.

If you discover a problem, you have two op­tions:

1.  Hope the customer doesn’t discover it.

2.  Bring the problem and a solution to the customer’s attention.

Taking the first option is like hiding your new golf clubs in the basement or standing in front of the big dent in the car: eventually, someone will find out. Eventually, your customer will discover the problem. The cover-up may only worsen matters because customers will not only question the quality of your product but your integrity as well. The second approach is not without its risks, but the potential reward of a satisfied customer is generally worth the draw­backs. Learning how to retain customers when this situation arises is a “moment of truth” that ultimately will shape the customer experience you deliver.

The inherent risks of bringing a problem to the customer’s attention can be eliminated or mini­mized by these factors:

  • Your presentation manner. Are you able to connect with the customer on an emotional level?
  • Quality of the solution. Does your solution address the customer does stated and implied concerns?
  • Effectiveness of the implementation. Do you deliver what you promise?
  • Follow-through. Do you confirm that the customer’s concerns were met?

In a technology-driven  business environment it’s easy to use email, voice mail etc to deliver your message. Don’t fall into that trap. Retaining customers is your goal so it’s important to address product problems with a personal touch. This means connecting personally with the customer whenever and wherever possible.To effectively handle this type of moment of truth take the follow­ing steps:

  • Explain the problem. Avoid trying to fix blame. Accept personal responsibility.
  • Acknowledge and listen to the customer’s concerns. Listening to and observing the custom­er’s “words and music” will help you gauge how to present your solution.
  • Address the problem with a course of action.  Your solution should address the cause of the problem as well as your cust­omer’s concerns.
  • Maintain the customer’s confidence in the product or service. This is usually accom­plished after you have imple­ment­ed the solution to the customer’s satisfaction. It requires conscientious fol­low-up on your part.

Problems will occur with your products and services. How you retain customers when they do should be an integral part of how you conduct business. Be pro-active and keep the customer’s needs and emotions in mind when you respond. Your actions will help define the quality of the customer experience as well as the longevity of the customer relationship.

Want to learn how your customer relationship strategies stack up? Take the Grow Positioning Survey now.

 

Developing Salespeople While Coaching on the Run

One of the biggest casualties in the battle to “do more with less” is developing salespeople. With fiercer competition, shorter deadlines, and the urgent replac­ing the important, sales managers are starting to view developing salespeople as a luxury they just can’t developing peopleafford.

Although common, this approach to manage­ment is short-sighted and can lead to long-term disaster. Even with more demands on your time you must realize that developing salespeople isn’t something you do instead of your job. It is your job!

This means finding opportunities to make a difference as they present themselves.

The key to coaching on the run is the “hand in the bucket” test. When you put your hand in a bucket of water, the water level rises.  This is the case when a you spend time with a sales­person. While you are present, the sales­person’s level of perfor­mance is elevated.  The real test for developing salespeople occurs when you are no longer present. Does the salesperson’s performance return to the previous level, or does it stay elevat­ed?  In other words, did you leave something with the salesperson to make a real and lasting difference?

Before we discuss some of the specific aspects and techniques for coaching on the run, let’s review what it takes for salespeople to perform at their optimal level. Use the checklist below to determine if you’re giving your salespeople what they need to win.

Coaching Checklist for Developing Salespeople

  • Do your people have a clear understanding of what they are expected to do?
  • Do your people have clear standards for ac­ceptable performance?
  • Do your people have the authority and re­sourc­es to perform effectively?
  • Do your people encounter little task interfer­ence (e.g., conflicting goals, objectives, procedures,   etc?)
  • Do your people receive timely and accurate feedback on their performance?
  • Do your people receive positive conse­quences and reinforcement for performing the job as it’s supposed to be done?
  • Do your people experience negative conse­quences when they fail to perform?

These guidelines apply to performance in general, as well as specifics tasks and assignments. Use the questions to assess your coaching abilities and to analyze performance problems.

Each “no” represents a potential performance problem for developing salespeople. Taking action to convert your “no” respons­es to “yes” will go a long way toward improving your people’s performance.